Tag: Holocaust

The importance of Holocaust Memorial Day in 2019 for ‘Brexit Britain’

Britain’s largest Holocaust memorial is to be built in Victoria Tower Gardens next to the Palace of Westminster. Scheduled to arrive in 2021, the winning design will consist of a learning centre as well as 23 bronze fin structures with spaces for people to move in between – reminiscent of Berlin’s Memorial to the Murdered… Continue reading “The importance of Holocaust Memorial Day in 2019 for ‘Brexit Britain’”

Warsaw Ghetto – The Jewish Resistance Spills German Blood

In this Insight blog, the first in a CARR series commemorating Holocaust Memorial Day, Senior Fellow Chris Webb takes a powerful look at the events that led up to the 1943 Warsaw Ghetto Uprising – including the 1942 Gross-Aktion Warsaw. In particular, he focuses on the January Street Battles – the first time the Jewish… Continue reading “Warsaw Ghetto – The Jewish Resistance Spills German Blood”

Climate change, Holocaust denial and the ‘lies of our times’

In a recent interview, Heinz-Christian Strache, Vice-Chancellor of Austria and leader of the radical-right Freedom Party of Austria, noted, that ‘Environmental Protection is Homeland Protection!’. Concerns over the environment along these lines are in no way new to the radical right and have been articulated by both anti-liberal and outright anti-democratic members of this political… Continue reading “Climate change, Holocaust denial and the ‘lies of our times’”

On Cupboards

Back in November 2018, restrictions on reporting on five people convicted of belonging to the banned National Action, a violent radical right movement, were lifted. Among them were Mikko Vehvilainen, a Finnish-born veteran of Afghanistan still serving in the British Army at the time of his arrest, and Alexander Deakin, the unemployed Midlands organiser of… Continue reading “On Cupboards”

The Kindertransport was controversial too – it teaches us that hostility can be overcome

Eighty years after the Kindertransport, politicization of the supposed threats to western ways of life represented by refugees have become commonplace. Eighty years ago, German Jewish parents sent their children to the UK on a scheme known as the Kindertransport. Some 10,000 children arrived in the framework of a programme of which the UK is… Continue reading “The Kindertransport was controversial too – it teaches us that hostility can be overcome”

The Sobibor Death Camp Revolt – October 14, 1943 – Part 2

Content Warning: The following blog contains depictions of violence within the eyewitness account which some readers may find distressing. Reader discretion is advised.    In the second of a two-part series, Senior Fellow, Chris Webb, covers one of the most courageous events of the Second World War, where Jewish prisoners, against all the odds, rose… Continue reading “The Sobibor Death Camp Revolt – October 14, 1943 – Part 2”