Month: September 2019

CARR-Hedayah Far Right De-Radicalisation Webinar Series

What is deradicalisation? And what does it look like for individuals involved in radical right movements? As part of a new EU-STRIVE funded project with Hedayah, CARR will be unpicking these questions along with practitioners, former violent extremists and academic experts in a yearlong webinar series looking at far right deradicalisation good practices. Taking an hour-long discussion-based, question-and-answer format with… Continue reading “CARR-Hedayah Far Right De-Radicalisation Webinar Series”

Manifesto memes: the radical right’s new dangerous visual rhetorics

These memes frame violent mass murder as sanctified white male dominance and a pathway for disaffected young white men to recover their “proper” masculinity. A new series of memes are being shared on social media platforms, including 4Chan and the 8Chan replacement EndChan. These memes visually connect violent Incel culture – an offshoot of Pick… Continue reading “Manifesto memes: the radical right’s new dangerous visual rhetorics”

War against the core values: Rise of the radical right in a context of hybrid war

Civilisations tend to exist either in a state of war or peace. Clausewitz reminds us that war is none other than “the continuation of politics by other means”. However, war does not stay the same; it changes, evolves, and grows depending on the context and time period it’s situated in. One person to examine the… Continue reading “War against the core values: Rise of the radical right in a context of hybrid war”

The Radical Right Seeks To Recruit Among Anti-Corporate Activists

Right-wing white nationalists are co-opting the language used by left-wing anti-corporate activists in order to expand their racist movement. ‘Corporate America doesn’t need to be destroyed, but just shown that they are on the wrong side of history. That if they don’t bend, they will break.’ These are the alleged words of the shooter in… Continue reading “The Radical Right Seeks To Recruit Among Anti-Corporate Activists”

Why Is the Radical Right Obsessed With Southern Africa?

In interrogating the far right’s persistent obsession with southern Africa, we can better understand what people like Trump, Hopkins, and terrorists like Roof, mean when they invoke it today. In 2018, the President of the United States Donald Trump posted a rather enigmatic tweet about“farm seizures and expropriations and the large scale killing of farmers”… Continue reading “Why Is the Radical Right Obsessed With Southern Africa?”

Purifying the Party: Lessons from 20th Century Radical Right Parties

The pattern of leadership squabbles, purges, and brutal attempts to crush dissent dominates the history of the radical right. Such episodes are extremely instructive in the week following UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson’s, expulsion of 21 Conservative MPs. The question this therefore begs is: why right-wing leaders so consistently felt the need to expel troublesome… Continue reading “Purifying the Party: Lessons from 20th Century Radical Right Parties”

Not the Same Difference: How the New Right hijacked an essential postmodern concept

In this post, I discuss how the concept of “difference” is a surprising link between postmodern thought and the New Right. In New Culture, New Right: Anti-Liberalism in Postmodern Europe, Michael O’Meara (2004) lays out a searing critique of postmodernism in the process of defending the rise of a revolutionary New Right that arrived in… Continue reading “Not the Same Difference: How the New Right hijacked an essential postmodern concept”

Behind Norway’s terrorist attack that was luckily thwarted

Has the Norwegian police learned anything from its failure in the 2011 Breivik attacks?   A recent terror attack at a mosque near Oslo raises important questions about the extent and range of radical right extremism and the Norwegian state response to it. On the 10th of August 2019, the young radical right extremist Philip… Continue reading “Behind Norway’s terrorist attack that was luckily thwarted”

On inclusive and exclusive flags

Flags are one of the most recognisable cultural artefacts that identify any community since they confer social cohesion to the group (Reichl 2004, Knowlton 2012,Leone 2018). The semiotic relevance of flags is evident, as they become an expression of a collective experience therefore constructing communities and eliciting multiple emotional and pragmatic responses. Flags construct a… Continue reading “On inclusive and exclusive flags”