Tag: EDL

Mentoring the radical right: talking to a Channel referral and his mentor

“There is no doubt in my mind that by far the most important and effective element of Channel is mentoring.” “The main reason I left the far right was because of my mentor’s guidance.” (Jack, former Prevent referral) Every year in the UK, Prevent helps hundreds of people leave extremist ideologies behind and walk a… Continue reading “Mentoring the radical right: talking to a Channel referral and his mentor”

The DFLA: a(nother) new UK far right movement?

Britain’s far-right undertow turns hostile currents against ethnic and religious minorities into a tsunami of hatred. Pause a moment to register two unloved anniversaries. This spring marks a decade since the first anti-Muslim street movement, the English Defence League (EDL), emerged on British streets. Slowly but surely, the Democratic Football Lads Alliance (DFLA), now a… Continue reading “The DFLA: a(nother) new UK far right movement?”

The Yellow Vest phenomenon and the radical right

Alexander Gauland publicly supported the protests, while Princess Doris von Sayn-Wittgenstein, patron of the AfD in the Land of Schleswig-Holstein, posted a photograph of herself wearing a yellow vest. So-called ‘yellow vest’ movements are now active across the globe. Beginning in France on 17 November 2018, the ‘yellow vests’ (named after the fluorescent safety vests French… Continue reading “The Yellow Vest phenomenon and the radical right”

Local policy responses to anti-Islamic protest in the UK need to consider both exclusionary and inclusionary approaches

Over the past ten years, the UK has seen significant shifts on the far right. As the prospect of parliamentary representation by the neo-fascist British National Party petered out in 2010, a new wave of anti-Islamic protests and direct action initiatives swept the country. Over the same period, we have seen the rise and fall… Continue reading “Local policy responses to anti-Islamic protest in the UK need to consider both exclusionary and inclusionary approaches”